April 2 – July 3, 2022

Grid

Meghan Price

Quebec

Curated by Melanie Egan.

Exhibition image

Big Sham 1, 2021. Woven rayon, cotton and nylon. Image by Huy Lam.

Event Info At A Glance

Price Overview: Free

Venue Overview: South Vitrines

Overview

Using textiles, artist Meghan Price takes woven cloth and perspective to skew our view of a simple concept of a grid and how that interacts with our concept of scale and space.

“The grid is commonly employed as a stable matrix and fixed standard, but a malleable woven grid is made when its axes are drawn in thread. In the series titled Sham, woven cloth is stretched flat to express its pliable nature optically. Here, plane and fold appear the same. Trompe l’oeil exposes gaps between perception and reality, allowing uncertainty to take hold. I am interested in what this perspective makes possible regarding how we measure and move through the world.” – Meghan Price

About Meghan Price

Through an expansive material-based practice grounded in textiles, Meghan Price connects human experience to the physical earth. Price has exhibited across Canada and internationally, including the Art Museum at the University of Toronto (Toronto), Toronto Pearson International Airport (Toronto), Fiberspace Gallery (Stockholm), Walter Phillips Gallery (Banff), McClaren Art Centre (Barrie) and the Centre for Craft Creativity and Design (Asheville). She has held residencies at the Scottish Sculpture Workshop, the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity and the Icelandic Textile Center and Artspace (Australia). She has works in the collections at RBC, Aimia, Canada Goose and the Cambridge Galleries/Idea Exchange. Meghan Price is represented by United Contemporary (Toronto). 

Meghan Price would like to acknowledge the generous support of the Ontario Arts Council and the Canada Council for the Arts in the exhibition of this work.  Courtesy of United Contemporary.

Venue

South Vitrines

Display cases in the South Hallway

Indoors

Wheelchair Accessible

235 Queens Quay W

Toronto, ON, M5J 2G8

Keywords Public Art