September 21, 2022 – January 8, 2023

Animal Vegetable Mineral c.1700s

Mary Anne Barkhouse

Ontario

Curated by Melanie Egan

Mary Anne Barkhouse

Photo courtesy of the artist

Event Info At A Glance

Price Overview: Free

Venue Overview: 245 Queens Quay W

Overview

This installation is a commentary on the historical and ongoing resource extraction employed by Canada. Barkhouse presents “Canada’s colonial souvenir shop as a representation of the commodification of Canada’s natural landscapes.” 

Mary Anne Barkhouse would like to acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts and the Ontario Arts Council. In addition, she would like to thank her parents, Alan and Mary Barkhouse, for their unwavering enthusiasm and support for all her endeavours. 

As part of Nuit Blanche

About Mary Anne Barkhouse

Mary Anne Barkhouse was born in Vancouver, British Columbia but had strong ties to both coasts as her mother is from the Namgis First Nation of Alert Bay, BC, and her father is of German and British descent from Nova Scotia. She is a descendant of a long line of internationally recognized Northwest Coast artists, including Ellen Neel, Mungo Martin and Charlie James. She graduated with Honours from the Ontario College of Art in Toronto and has exhibited widely across Canada and the United States. 

As a result of personal and family experiences with land and water stewardship, Barkhouse’s work examines ecological concerns and intersections of culture through animal imagery. Inspired by issues surrounding empire and survival, Barkhouse creates installations that evoke consideration of the self in response to history and the environment. 

A member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts, Barkhouse’s work can be found in numerous private and public collections. 

Venue

245 Queens Quay W

Tuesdays to Sundays, 12–6pm

Holiday Mondays, 12–6pm

Large gallery space located in a large brick building, separate from the Harbourfront Centre main building.

Wheelchair Accessible

245 Queens Quay W

Toronto, ON,

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Keywords Public Art